The Unicode CLDR
Version 41
has been released, and has already been integrated into
ICU.

CLDR v41 is a limited-submission release. Most work was on tooling, with only specified
updates to the data, namely Phase 3 of the grammatical units of measurement project.
The required grammar data for the Modern coverage level increased, with 40 locales
adding an average of 4% new data each. Ukrainian grew the most, by 15.6%.
The tooling changes are targeted at the v42 general submission release. They
include a number of features and improvements such as progress meter widgets in the

Survey Tool
.

Finally, the Basic level has been modified to make it easier to onboard new
languages, and easier for implementations to filter locale data based on
coverage levels.

The following table shows the number of Languages/Locales in this version. (See
the
v41 Locale Coverage

table for more information.)

Level

Languages 

Locales 

Notes

Modern

89

361

Suitable for full UI internationalization

Moderate

13

32

Suitable for full “document content” internationalization, such as formats in a spreadsheet.

Basic

22

21

Suitable for locale selection, such as choice of language in mobile phone settings.

Total

124

414

Total of all languages/locales with ≥ Basic coverage.

Beyond the member organizations of the Unicode Consortium, many dedicated
communities and individuals regularly contribute to updating their locales,
including:

Modern: Cherokee, Cantonese, Scottish Gaelic,  Sorbian (Lower), Sorbian (Upper)

Moderate: Asturian [nearly Modern], Breton, Faroese, Fulah (Adlam), Kaingang, Nheengatu, Quechua, Sardinian

Basic: Bosnian (Cyrillic), Interlingua, Kabuverdianu, Māori, Romansh, Tajik, Tatar, Tongan, Uzbek (Cyrillic), Wolof

For details, see the

Unicode CLDR v41 Release Note
.

The next version of CLDR, version 42, is slated to start General Submission on
May 18, 2022.

Unicode CLDR provides key building blocks for software supporting the
world’s languages. CLDR data is used by all
major software
systems
(including all mobile phones) for their software
internationalization and localization, adapting software to the conventions of
different languages.

Over 144,000 characters are available for adoption
to help the Unicode Consortium’s work on digitally disadvantaged languages